Create a CI/CD Pipeline with Gatsby.js, Netlify and Travis CI

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What is Gatsby?

Gatsby is a Static Site Generator for React built on Node.js. Gatsby uses a modern web technology stack based on client-side Javascript, reusable APIs, and prebuilt Markdown, otherwise known as the JAMstack. This method of building a site is fast, secure, and scalable. All production site pages are prebuilt and static, so Gatsby does not have to build HTML for each page request.

What is the CI/CD Pipeline?

The CI/CD (continuous integration/continuous delivery) pipeline created in this guide is an automated sequence of events that is initiated after you update the code for your website on your local computer. These events take care of the work that you would otherwise need to perform manually: previewing your in-development site, testing your new code, and deploying it to your production server. These actions are powered by GitHub, Netlify, and Travis CI.

Note
This guide uses GitHub as your central Git repository, but you can use any service that is compatible with Netlify and Travis.

Netlify

Netlify is a PaaS (Platform as a Service) provider that allows you to quickly deploy static sites on the Netlify platform. In this guide Netlify will be used to provide a preview of your Gatsby site while it is in development. This preview can be shared with different stakeholders for site change approvals, or with anyone that is interested in your project. The production version of your website will ultimately be deployed to a Linode, so Netlify will only be used to preview development of the site.

Travis CI

Travis CI is a continuous integration tool that tests and deploys the code you upload to your GitHub repository. Travis will be used in this guide to deploy your Gatsby site to a Linode running Ubuntu 18.04. Testing your website code will not be explored in depth, but the method for integrating unit tests will be introduced.

The CI/CD Pipeline Sequence

This guide sets up the following flow of events:

  1. You create a new branch in your local Git repository and make code changes to your Gatsby project.

  2. You push your branch to your GitHub repository and create a pull request.

  3. Netlify automatically creates a preview of the site with a unique URL that can be shared.

  4. Travis CI automatically builds the site in an isolated container and runs any declared tests.

  5. When all tests pass, you merge the PR into the repository’s master branch, which automatically triggers a deployment to your production Linode.

Before You Begin

  1. Follow the Getting Started guide and deploy a Linode running Ubuntu 18.04.

  2. Complete the Securing Your Server guide to create a limited Linux user account with sudo privileges, harden SSH access, and remove unnecessary network services.

    Note

    This guide is written for a non-root user. Commands that require elevated privileges are prefixed with sudo. If you’re not familiar with the sudo command, visit our Users and Groups guide.

    All configuration files should be edited with elevated privileges. Remember to include sudo before running your text editor.

  3. Configure DNS for your site by adding a domain zone and setting up reverse DNS on your Linode’s IP.

  4. Create a GitHub account if you don’t already have one. GitHub is free for open source projects.

  5. Install Git on your local computer. Later in this guide, Homebrew will be used to install Gatsby on a Mac, so it’s recommended that you also use Homebrew to install Git if you’re using a Mac.

Prepare Your Production Linode

Install NGINX

  1. Install NGINX from Ubuntu’s repository on your Linode:

    sudo apt install nginx
    

Configure NGINX

  1. Delete the default welcome page:

    sudo rm /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/default
    
  2. Create a site configuration file for Gatsby. Replace example.com in the file name and in the file’s contents with your domain name:

    /etc/nginx/conf.d/example.com.conf
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    server {
        listen       80;
        server_name  example.com;
        #charset koi8-r;
        #access_log  /var/log/nginx/host.access.log  main;
    
        location / {
            root   /usr/share/nginx/html/example.com/public;
            index  index.html index.htm;
        }
    }
    Note
    Replace all future instances of example.com in this guide with your domain name.
  3. The root directive in your NGINX configuration points to a directory named public within /usr/share/nginx/html/example.com/. Later in this guide, Gatsby will be responsible for creating the public directory and building its static content within it (specifically, via the gatsby build command).

    The /usr/share/nginx/html/example.com/ directory does not exist on your server yet, so create it:

    sudo mkdir -p /usr/share/nginx/html/example.com/
    
  4. The Gatsby deployment script that will be introduced later in this guide will run under your limited Linux user. Set your limited user to be the owner of the new document root directory. This ensures the deployment script will be able write your site’s files to it:

    sudo chown $(whoami):$(id -gn) -R /usr/share/nginx/html/example.com/
    
  5. Test your NGINX configuration for errors:

    sudo nginx -t
    
  6. Reload the configuration:

    sudo nginx -s reload
    
  7. Navigate to your Linode’s domain or IP address in a browser. Your Gatsby site files aren’t deployed yet, so you should only see a 404 Not Found error. Still, this error indicates that your NGINX process is running as expected.

Develop with Gatsby on Your Local Computer

You will develop with Gatsby on your local computer. This guide walks through creating a simple sample Gatsby website, but more extensive website development is not explored, so review Gatsby’s official documentation afterwards for more information on the subject.

Install Gatsby

This section provides instructions for installing Gatsby via Node.js and the Node Package Manager (npm) on Mac and Linux computers. If you are using a Windows PC, read Gatsby’s official documentation for installation instructions.

  1. Install npm on your local computer. If you are running Ubuntu or Debian on your computer, use apt:

    sudo apt install nodejs npm
    

    If you have a Mac, use Homebrew:

    brew install nodejs npm
    
  2. Ensure Node.js was installed by checking its version:

    node --version
    
  3. Install the Gatsby command line:

    sudo npm install --global gatsby-cli
    

Create a Gatsby Site

  1. Gatsby uses starters to provide a pre-configured base Gatsby site that you can customize and build on top of. This guide uses the Hello World starter. On your local computer, install the Hello World starter in your home directory (using the name example-site for your new project) and navigate into it:

    gatsby new example-site https://github.com/gatsbyjs/gatsby-starter-hello-world
    cd ~/example-site
    
  2. Inspect the contents of the directory:

    ls
    

    You should see output similar to:

      
    LICENSE  node_modules  package.json  package-lock.json  README.md  src
    
    

    The src directory contains your project’s source files. This starter will include the React Javascript component file src/pages/index.js, which will be mapped to our example site’s homepage.

    Gatsby uses React components to build your site’s static pages. Components are small and isolated pieces of code, and Gatsby stores them in the src/pages directory. When your Gatsby site is built, these will automatically become your site’s pages, with paths based on each file’s name.

  3. Gatsby offers a built-in development server which builds and serves your Gatsby site. This server will also monitor any changes made to your src directory’s React components and will rebuild Gatsby after every change, which helps you see your local changes as you make them.

    Open a new shell session (in addition the one you already have open) and run the Gatsby development server:

    cd ~/example-site
    gatsby develop
    
  4. The gatsby develop command will display messages from the build process, including a section similar to the following:

      
    You can now view gatsby-starter-hello-world in the browser.
    
        http://localhost:8000/
    
    

    Copy and paste the http://localhost:8000/ URL (or the specific string displayed in your terminal) into your web browser to view your Gatsby site. You should see a page that displays “Hello World”.

  5. In your original shell session, view the contents of your example-site directory again:

    ls
    
      
        LICENSE  node_modules  package.json  package-lock.json  README.md  src  public
        
    

    You should now see a public directory which was not present before. This directory holds the static files built by Gatsby. Your NGINX server will serve the static files located in the public directory.

  6. Open the src/pages/index.js file in your text editor, add new text between the <div> tags, and save your change:

    src/pages/index.js
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    import React from "react"
    
    export default () => <div>Hello world and universe!</div>
    
  7. Navigate back to your browser window, where the updated text should automatically appear on the page.

Version Control Your Gatsby Project

In the workflow explored by this guide, Git and GitHub are used to:

  • Track changes you make during your site’s development.
  • Trigger the preview, test, and deployment functions offered by Netlify and Travis.

The following steps present how to initialize a new local Git repository for your Gatsby project, and how to connect it to a central GitHub repository.

  1. Open a shell session on your local computer and navigate to the example-site directory. Initialize a Git repository to begin tracking your project files:

    git init
    

    Stage all the files you’ve created so far for your first commit:

    git add -A
    

    The Hello World starter includes a .gitignore file. Your .gitignore designates which files and directories to ignore in your Git commits. By default, it is set to ignore any files in the public directory. The public directory’s files will not be tracked in this repository, as they can be quickly rebuilt by anyone who clones your repository.

  2. Commit all the Hello World starter files:

    git commit -m "Initial commit"
    
  3. Navigate to your GitHub account and create a new repository named example-site. After the repository is created, copy its URL, which will have the form https://github.com/your-github-username/example-site.git.

  4. In your local computer’s shell session, add the GitHub repository as your local repository’s origin:

    git remote add origin https://github.com/your-github-username/example-site.git
    
  5. Verify the origin remote’s location:

    git remote -v
    
      
    origin	https://github.com/your-github-username/example-site.git (fetch)
    origin	https://github.com/your-github-username/example-site.git (push)
    
    
  6. Push the master branch of your local repository to the origin repository:

    git push origin master
    
  7. View your GitHub account in your browser, navigate to the example-site repository, and verify that all the files have been pushed to it successfully:

    GitHub Initial Commit

Preview Your Site with Netlify

In the course of developing a website (or any other software project), a common practice when you’ve finished a new feature and would like to share it with your collaborators is to create a pull request (also referred to as a PR). A pull request is an intermediate step between uploading your work to GitHub (by pushing the changes to a new branch) and later merging it into the master branch (or another release or development branch, according to your specific Git workflow).

Once connected to your GitHub account, the Netlify service can build a site preview from your PR’s code every time you create a PR. Netlify will also regenerate your site preview if you commit and push new updates to your PR’s branch while the PR is still open. A random, unique URL is assigned to every preview, and you can share these URLs with your collaborators.

Connect Your GitHub Repository to Netlify

  1. Navigate to the Netlify site and click on the Sign Up link:

    Netlify Home Page

  2. Click on the GitHub button to connect your GitHub account with Netlify. If you used a different version control service, select that option instead:

    GitHub and Netlify connection page

  3. You will be taken to the GitHub site and asked to authorize Netlify to access your account. Click on the Authorize Netlify button:

    GitHub Netlify Authorization

  4. Add your new site to Netlify and continue along with the prompts to finish connecting your repository to Netlify. Be sure to select the GitHub repository created in the previous steps:

    Add site to Netlify

  5. Provide the desired deploy settings for your repository. Unless you are sure you need to change these settings, keep the Netlify defaults:

    Netlify repository settings

    Note
    You can add a netlify.toml configuration file to your Git repository to define more deployment settings.

Create a Pull Request

  1. In your local Git repository, create a new branch to test Netlify:

    git checkout -b test-netlify
    
  2. On your computer, edit your src/pages/index.js and update the message displayed:

    src/pages/index.js
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    import React from "react"
    
    export default () => <div>Hello world, universe, and multiverse!</div>
    
  3. Commit those changes:

    git add .
    git commit -m "Testing Netlify"
    
  4. Push the new branch to the origin repository:

    git push origin test-netlify
    
  5. Navigate to the example-site repository in your GitHub account and create a pull request with the test-netlify branch:

    GitHub Compare and Pull Request Banner

  6. After you create the pull request, you will see a deploy/netlify row with a Details link. The accent color for this row will initially be yellow while the Netlify preview is being built. When the preview’s build process is finished, this row will turn green. At that point, you can click on the Details link to view your Gatsby site’s preview.

    Netlify GitHub Preview

    Every time you push changes to your branch, Netlify will provide a new preview link.

Test and Deploy Your Site with Travis CI

Travis CI manages testing your Gatsby site and deploying it to the Linode production server. Travis does this by monitoring updates to your GitHub repository:

  • Travis’s tests will run when a pull request is created, whenever new commits are pushed to that pull request’s branch, and whenever a branch is updated on your GitHub repository in general (including outside the context of a pull request).

  • Travis’s deployment function will trigger whenever a pull request has been merged into the master branch (and optionally when merging into other branches, depending on your configuration).

Connect Your GitHub Repository to Travis CI

  1. Navigate to the Travis CI site and click on the Sign up with GitHub button.

    Note
    Be sure to visit travis-ci.com, not travis-ci.org. Travis originally operated travis-ci.com for paid/private repositories, and travis-ci.org was run separately for free/open source projects. As of May 2018, travis-ci.com supports open source projects and should be used for all new projects. Projects on travis-ci.org will eventually be migrated to travis-ci.com.
  2. You will be redirected to your GitHub account. Authorize Travis CI to access your GitHub account:

    Authorize Travis CI

  3. You will be redirected to your Travis CI account’s page where you will be able to see a listing of all your public repositories. Click on the toggle button next to your Gatsby repository to activate Travis CI for it.

Configure Travis CI to Run Tests

Travis’s functions are all configured by adding and editing a .travis.yml file in the root of your project. When .travis.yml is present in your project and you push a commit to your central GitHub respository, Travis performs one or more builds.

Travis builds are run in new virtualized environments created for each build. The build lifecycle is primarily composed of an install step and a script step. The install step is responsible for installing your project’s dependencies in the new virtual environment. The script step invokes one or more bash scripts that you specify, usually test scripts of some kind.

  1. Navigate to your local Gatsby project and create a new Git branch to keep track of your Travis configurations:

    git checkout -b travis-configs
    
  2. Create your .travis.yml file at the root of the project:

    touch .travis.yml
    
    Note
    Make sure you commit changes at logical intervals as you modify the files in your Git repository.
  3. Open your .travis.yml file in a text editor and add the following lines:

    ~/example-site/.travis.yml
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    language: node_js
    node_js:
      - '10.0'
    
    dist: trusty
    sudo: false

    This configuration specifies that the build’s virtual environment should be Ubuntu 14.04 (also known as trusty). sudo: false indicates that the virtual environment should be a container, and not a full virtual machine. Other environments are available.

    Gatsby is built with Node.js, so the Travis configuration is set to use node_js as the build language, and to use the latest version of Node (10.0 at the time of this guide’s publication). When Node is specified as the build language, Travis automatically sets default values for the install and script steps: install will run npm install, and script will run npm test. Other languages, like Python, are also available.

  4. The Gatsby Hello World starter provides a package.json file, which is a collection of metadata that describes your project. It is used by npm to install, run, and test your project. In particular, it includes a dependencies section used by npm install, and a scripts section where you can declare the tests run by npm test.

    No tests are listed by default in your starter’s package.json, so open the file with your editor and add a test line to the scripts section:

    package.json
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    {
      "name": "gatsby-starter-hello-world",
      "description": "Gatsby hello world starter",
      "license": "MIT",
      "scripts": {
        "develop": "gatsby develop",
        "build": "gatsby build",
        "serve": "gatsby serve",
        "test": "echo 'Run your tests here'"
      },
      "dependencies": {
        "gatsby": "^1.9.277",
        "gatsby-link": "^1.6.46"
      }
    }

    This entry is just a stub to illustrate where tests are declared. For more information on how to test your Gatsby project, review the unit testing documentation on Gatsby’s website. Jest is the testing framework recommended by Gatsby.

View Output from Your Travis Build

  1. Commit the changes you’ve made and push your travis-configs branch to your origin repository:

    git add .
    git commit -m "Travis testing configuration"
    git push origin travis-configs
    
  2. View your GitHub repository in your browser and create a pull request for the travis-configs branch.

  3. Several rows that link to your Travis builds will appear in your new pull request. When a build finishes running without error, the build’s accent color will turn green:

    GitHub Travis Builds

    Note

    Four rows for your Travis builds will appear, which is more than you may expect. This is because Travis runs your builds whenever your branch is updated, and whenever your pull request is updated, and Travis considers these to be separate events.

    In addition, the rows prefixed by Travis CI - are links to GitHub’s preview of those builds, while rows prefixed with continuous-integration/travis-ci/ are direct links to the builds on travis-ci.com.

    For now, these builds will produce identical output. After the deployment functions of Travis have been configured, the pull request builds will skip the deployment step, while the branch builds will implement your deployment configuration.

  4. Click the Details link in the continuous-integration/travis-ci/push row to visit the logs for that build. A page with similar output will appear:

    Travis Build Logs - First Test

    Towards the end of your output, you should see the “Run your tests here” message from the test stub that you entered in your package.json. If you implement testing of your code with Jest or another library, the output from those tests will appear at this location in your build logs.

    If any of the commands that Travis CI runs in the script step (or in any preceding steps, like install) returns with a non-zero exit code, then the build will fail, and you will not be able to merge your pull request on GitHub.

  5. For now, do not merge your pull request, even if the builds were successful.

Give Travis Permission to Deploy to Your Linode

In order to let Travis push your code to your production Linode, you first need to give the Travis build environment access to the Linode. This will be accomplished by generating a public-private key pair for your build environment and then uploading the public key to your Linode. Your code will be deployed over SSH, and the SSH agent in the build environment will be configured to use your new private key.

The private key will also need to be encrypted, as the key file will live in your Gatsby project’s Git repository, and you should never check a plain-text version of it into version control.

  1. Install the Travis CLI, which you will need to generate an encrypted version of your private key. The Travis CLI is distributed as a Ruby gem:

    On Linux:

    sudo apt install ruby ruby-dev
    sudo gem install travis
    

    On macOS:

    sudo gem install travis
    

    On Windows: Use RubyInstaller to install Ruby and the Travis CLI gem.

  2. Log in to Travis CI with the CLI:

    travis login --com
    

    Follow the prompts to provide your GitHub login credentials. These credentials are passed directly to GitHub and are not recorded by Travis. In exchange, GitHub returns a GitHub access token to Travis, after which Travis will provide your CLI with a Travis access token.

    Note
    The --com argument tells your CLI to log in to travis-ci.com (instead of travis-ci.org).
  3. Inside the root of your local example-site Git repository, create a scripts directory. This will hold files related to deploying your Gatsby site:

    mkdir scripts
    
  4. Generate a pair of SSH keys inside the scripts directory. The key pair will be named gatsby-deploy so that you don’t accidentally overwrite any preexisting key pairs. Replace your_email@example.com with your email address. When prompted for the key pair’s passphrase, enter no passphrase/leave the field empty:

    ssh-keygen -t rsa -b 4096 -C "your_email@example.com" -f scripts/gatsby-deploy
    

    Two files will be created: gatsby-deploy (your private key) and gatsby-deploy.pub (your public key).

  5. Add the location of the gatsby-deploy file to your project’s .gitignore file. This will ensure that you do not accidentally commit the secret key to your central repository:

    .gitignore
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    # Other .gitignore instructions
    # [...]
    scripts/gatsby-deploy
  6. Encrypt your private key using the Travis CLI:

    cd scripts && travis encrypt-file gatsby-deploy --add --com
    
  7. You should now see a gatsby-deploy.enc file in your scripts directory:

    ls
    
      
        gatsby-deploy		gatsby-deploy.enc	gatsby-deploy.pub
    
    
  8. The --add flag from the previous command also told the Travis CLI to add a few new lines to your .travis.yml file. These lines decrypt your private key and should look similar to the following snippet:

    .travis.yml
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    before_install:
    - openssl aes-256-cbc -K $encrypted_9e3557de08a3_key -iv $encrypted_9e3557de08a3_iv
      -in gatsby-deploy.enc -out gatsby-deploy -d
    About the openssl command and Travis build variables

    The second line (starting with -in gatsby-deploy.enc) is a continuation of the first line, and -in is an option passed to the openssl command. This line is not its own item in the before_install list.

    The openssl command accepts the encrypted gatsby-deploy.enc file and uses two environment variables to decrypt it, resulting in your original gatsby-deploy private key. These two variables are stored in the Settings page for your repository on travis-ci.com. Any variables stored there will be accessible to your build environment:

    Travis Environment Variables

  9. Edit the lines previously added by the travis encrypt-file command so that gatsby-deploy.enc and gatsby-deploy are prefixed with your scripts/ directory:

    .travis.yml
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    before_install:
    - openssl aes-256-cbc -K $encrypted_9e3557de08a3_key -iv $encrypted_9e3557de08a3_iv
      -in scripts/gatsby-deploy.enc -out scripts/gatsby-deploy -d
  10. Continue preparing the SSH agent in your build environment by adding the following lines to the before_install step, after the openssl command. Be sure to replace 192.0.2.2 with your Linode’s IP address:

    ~/example-site/.travis.yml
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    before_install:
    - openssl aes-256-cbc -K $encrypted_9e3557de08a3_key -iv $encrypted_9e3557de08a3_iv
      -in scripts/gatsby-deploy.enc -out scripts/gatsby-deploy -d
    - eval "$(ssh-agent -s)"
    - cp scripts/gatsby-deploy ~/.ssh/gatsby-deploy
    - chmod 600 ~/.ssh/gatsby-deploy
    - ssh-add ~/.ssh/gatsby-deploy
    - echo -e "Host 192.0.2.2\n\tStrictHostKeyChecking no\n" >> ~/.ssh/config
  11. Travis CI can add entries to the build environment’s ~/.ssh/known_hosts prior to deploying your site. Insert the following addons step prior to the before_install step in your .travis.yml. Replace 192.0.2.2 with your Linode’s IP address:

    ~/example-site/.travis.yml
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    # [...]
    dist: trusty
    sudo: false
    
    addons:
      ssh_known_hosts:
        - 192.0.2.2
    
    before_install:
    # [...]
  12. From your local computer, upload your Travis environment’s public key to the home directory of your limited Linux user on your Linode. Replace example_user with your Linode’s user and 192.0.2.2 with your Linode’s IP address:

    scp ~/example-site/scripts/gatsby-deploy.pub example_user@192.0.2.2:~/gatsby-deploy.pub
    
  13. Log in to your Linode (using the same user that the key was uploaded to) and copy the key into your authorized_keys file:

    mkdir -p .ssh
    cat gatsby-deploy.pub | tee -a .ssh/authorized_keys
    

Create a Deployment Script

  1. Update your .travis.yml to include a deploy step. This section will be executed when a pull request is merged into the master branch. Add the following lines below the before_install step, at the end of the file:

    ~/example-site/.travis.yml
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    deploy:
    - provider: script
      skip_cleanup: true
      script: bash scripts/deploy.sh
      on:
        branch: master

    The instructions for pushing your site to your Linode will be defined in a deploy.sh script that you will create.

    Full contents of your Travis configuration

    The complete and final version of your .travis.yml file should resemble the following:

    ~/example-site/.travis.yml
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    language: node_js
    node_js:
    - "10.0"
    
    dist: trusty
    sudo: false
    
    addons:
      ssh_known_hosts:
      - 192.0.2.2
    
    before_install:
    - openssl aes-256-cbc -K $encrypted_07d52615a665_key -iv $encrypted_07d52615a665_iv
      -in scripts/gatsby-deploy.enc -out scripts/gatsby-deploy -d
    - eval "$(ssh-agent -s)"
    - cp scripts/gatsby-deploy ~/.ssh/gatsby-deploy
    - chmod 600 ~/.ssh/gatsby-deploy
    - ssh-add ~/.ssh/gatsby-deploy
    - echo -e "Host 192.0.2.2\n\tStrictHostKeyChecking no\n" >> ~/.ssh/config
    
    deploy:
    - provider: script
      skip_cleanup: true
      script: bash scripts/deploy.sh
      on:
        branch: master
  2. From your local example-site Git repository, create a deploy.sh file in the scripts directory and make it executable:

    touch scripts/deploy.sh
    chmod +x scripts/deploy.sh
    
  3. Open your deploy.sh file in your text editor and add the following lines. Replace all instances of example_user with your Linode’s user, and replace 192.0.2.2 with your Linode’s IP:

    scripts/deploy.sh
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    #!/bin/bash
    set -x
    
    gatsby build
    
    # Configure Git to only push the current branch
    git config --global push.default simple
    
    # Remove .gitignore and replace with the production version
    rm -f .gitignore
    cp scripts/prodignore .gitignore
    cat .gitignore
    
    # Add the Linode production server as a remote repository
    git remote add production ssh://example_user@192.0.2.2:/home/example_user/gatsbybare.git
    
    # Add and commit all the static files generated by the Gatsby build
    git add . && git commit -m "Gatsby build"
    
    # Push all changes to the Linode production server
    git push -f production HEAD:refs/heads/master

    The deploy script builds the Gatsby static files (which are placed inside the public directory inside your repository) and pushes them to your Linode. Specifically, this script:

    • Commits the newly-built public directory to the Travis build environment’s copy of your Git repository.
    • Pushes that commit (over the SSH protocol) to a remote repository on your Linode, which you will create in the next section of this guide.
    Note
    Remember that because these instructions are executed in an isolated virtual environment, the git commit that is run here does not affect the repository on your local computer or on GitHub.
  4. You may recall that you previously updated your .gitignore file to exclude the public directory. To allow this directory to be committed in your build environment’s repository (and therefore pushed to your Linode), you will need to override that rule at deploy time.

    From the root of your local Gatsby project, copy your .gitignore to a new scripts/prodignore file:

    cp .gitignore scripts/prodignore
    

    Open your new prodignore file, remove the public line, and save the change:

    scripts/prodignore
    1
    2
    3
    
    .cache/
    public # Remove this line
    yarn-error.log

    The deploy.sh script you created includes a line that will copy this scripts/prodignore file into your repository’s root .gitgnore, which will then allow the script to commit the public directory.

Prepare the Remote Git Repository on Your Linode

In the previous section you completed the configuration for the Travis deployment step. In this section, you will prepare the Linode to receive Git pushes from your deployment script. The pushed website files will then be served by your NGINX web server.

  1. SSH into your Linode (under the same the user that holds your Travis build environment’s public key). Create a new directory inside your home folder named gatsbybare.git:

    mkdir ~/gatsbybare.git
    
  2. Navigate to the new directory and initialize it as a bare Git repository:

    cd ~/gatsbybare.git
    git init --bare
    

    A bare Git repository stores Git objects and does not maintain working copies (i.e. file changes that haven’t been committed) in the directory. Bare repositories provide a centralized place where users can push their changes. GitHub is an example of a bare Git repository. The common practice for naming a bare Git repository is to end the name with the .git extension.

  3. Configure the Git directory to allow linking two repositories together:

    git config receive.denyCurrentBranch updateInstead
    
  4. Your Travis build environment will now be able to push files into your Linode’s Git repository, but the files will not be located in your NGINX document root. To fix this, you will use the hooks feature of Git to copy your website files to the document root folder. Specifically, you can implement a post-receive hook that will run after every push to your Linode’s repository.

    In your Linode’s Git repository, create the post-receive file and make it executable:

    touch hooks/post-receive
    chmod +x hooks/post-receive
    
  5. Add the following lines to the post-receive file. Replace example.com with your domain name, and replace example_user with your Linode’s user:

    hooks/post-receive
    1
    2
    
    #!/bin/sh
    git --work-tree=/usr/share/nginx/html/example.com --git-dir=/home/example_user/gatsbybare.git checkout -f

    This script will check out the files from your Linode repository’s master branch into your document root folder.

    Note
    While a bare Git repository does not keep working copies of files within the repository’s directory, you can still use the --work-tree option to check out files into another directory.

Deploy with Travis CI

All of the test and deployment configuration work has been completed and can now be executed:

  1. Commit all remaining changes to your travis-configs branch and push them up to your central GitHub repository:

    git add .
    git commit -m "Travis deployment configuration"
    git push origin travis-configs
    
  2. Visit the pull request you previously created on GitHub for your travis-configs branch. If you visit this page shortly after the git push command is issued, the new Travis builds may still be in progress.

  3. After the linked continuous-integration/travis-ci/pr pull request Travis build completes, click on the corresponding Details link. If the build was successful, you should see the following message:

      
    Skipping a deployment with the script provider because the current build is a pull request.
    
    

    This message appears because pull request builds skip the deployment step.

  4. Back on the GitHub pull request page, after the linked continuous-integration/travis-ci/push branch build completes, click on the corresponding Details link. If the build was successful, you should see the following message:

      
    Skipping a deployment with the script provider because this branch is not permitted: travis-configs
    
    

    This message appears because your .travis.yml restricts the deployment script to updates on the master branch.

  5. If your Travis builds failed, review the build logs for the reason for the failure.

  6. If the builds succeeded, merge your pull request.

  7. After merging the pull request, visit travis-ci.com directly and view the example-site repository. A new Travis build corresponding to your Merge pull request commit will be in progress. When this build completes, a Deploying application message will appear at the end of the build logs. This message can be expanded to view the complete logs for the deploy step.

  8. If your deploy step succeeded, you can now visit your domain name in your browser. You should see the message from your Gatsby project’s index.js.

Troubleshooting

If your Travis builds are failing, here are some places to look when troubleshooting:

  • View the build logs for the failed Travis build.
  • Ensure all your .sh scripts are executable, including the Git hook on the Linode.
  • Test the Git hook on your Linode by running bash ~/gatsbybare.git/hooks/post-receive.
  • If you encounter permissions issues, make sure your Linode user can write files to your document root directory.
  • To view the contents of the bare Git repository, run git ls-tree --full-tree -r HEAD.

Next Steps

Read the Gatsby.js Tutorial to learn how to build a website with Gatsby.

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This guide is published under a CC BY-ND 4.0 license.