Using linode kernel over the built-in distro kernel.

As title.

I always used the linode kernel just because I don't have time to configure the one built in into the distro…

Is there someone here who is not using the linode kernel?

Do you think that is better to use the linode kernel or the default kernel offered by the distro?

Can you explain why?

11 Replies

First thing I always do when deploying a Linode is to switch the Linode provided kernel with the Debian kernel package and use pv_grub. It's stable, and it's usually well tested with the rest of the applications your distribution provides to ensure it works. Security updates also come from just one source, instead of having to check both Linode and my distribution for security announcements.

That's just my personal preference though!

@-Alex-:

First thing I always do when deploying a Linode is to switch the Linode provided kernel with the Debian kernel package and use pv_grub. It's stable, and it's usually well tested with the rest of the applications your distribution provides to ensure it works. Security updates also come from just one source, instead of having to check both Linode and my distribution for security announcements.

That's just my personal preference though!

the question is, is it better the good old debian kernel or the new one from linode?

@sblantipodi:

the question is, is it better the good old debian kernel or the new one from linode?

define "better". I don't think there's an easy answer.

The other issue is, distro kernels may be tested with the distro software, but Linode kernels are tested with Linode's infrastructure.

Which is more important is up to you, I suppose. I use the Linode kernels, because I'm on an older distro with questionable Xen domU support.

My answer has always been "Enh, it works, why change it. Best use the one Linode tested as working with their stuff."

@-Alex-:

First thing I always do when deploying a Linode is to switch the Linode provided kernel with the Debian kernel package and use pv_grub. It's stable, and it's usually well tested with the rest of the applications your distribution provides to ensure it works. Security updates also come from just one source, instead of having to check both Linode and my distribution for security announcements.

That's just my personal preference though!

I'm with you on this one. I'm not looking to run non-standard software based on the ISP; I'm looking to run Debian Stable everywhere.

I don't know, it seems to me that you're over-emphasizing the "non-standard" part.

Linode kernels come right from the main kernel distribution, but sometimes contain Xen-specific or other VPS-related patches that help in the Linode environment.

Given that the kernel is your hardware interface, and the hardware is virtualized under Linode's control, using Linode tested kernels is, I think, actually the more conservative/safe choice.

Of course, there's absolutely nothing wrong with using a different kernel if you need or prefer it. But at least for me, I'd only do it if I actually knew it gave me (or let me configure) something the default kernels didn't.

– David

I've been using the CentOS6 kernels ever since… well, they released CentOS6.

Why? SELinux, which isn't in the stock linode kernels.

We use the PV-grub and we turn off Xenify Distro.

Here's what happened (reason to use linode Kernel)

  • Restore from backup (linode backup)

  • Migrate to another DC

  • List not working

before restore

http://www.webpagescreenshot.info/img/4 … 11104507AM">http://www.webpagescreenshot.info/img/49892-8192011104507AM

It was the restore that didn't xenify

http://www.webpagescreenshot.info/img/6 … 11104559AM">http://www.webpagescreenshot.info/img/620162-8192011104559AM

I have done so on occasion. When I need to do something that requires a non-mainline kernel patch, and the distro tools are able to make it work without a complete kernel recompile, I'll run the distro's kernel. This is rare, but Ubuntu + Asterisk is the most frequent case for me.

Some distributions have broken tools that expect the kernel's API to never change or don't handle features being compiled into the kernel (vs. loaded at runtime via modules). Running the distro's kernel will usually mitigate these, although that doesn't fix the real issue.

Reply

Please enter an answer
Tips:

You can mention users to notify them: @username

You can use Markdown to format your question. For more examples see the Markdown Cheatsheet.

> I’m a blockquote.

I’m a blockquote.

[I'm a link] (https://www.google.com)

I'm a link

**I am bold** I am bold

*I am italicized* I am italicized

Community Code of Conduct