Linode is awesome!

Avatar neonnero 4 months, 1 week ago

Not really a question, but more of a testimonial.

I now have 5 Linodes running, across London, Newark, Dallas, and Frankfurt, and I also have an EC2 instance running at AWS, basically just because they had a better offer when it came to more storage space at the time I needed to set it up (about 4 years ago).

I've been a satisfied customer of Linode for about 13 years now, since some of the early days, and I've never had an issue at all. Any issues that have come up, have already been addressed before they've really happened, and that's a great plus.

And now that Linode has introduced block storage in all the data centers I'm in (last one announced was London), I thought I'd do a more up-to-date price comparison on my AWS usage.

On AWS, I have a t2.micro EC2, with 200 GiB EBS storage (EC2 instances don't come with any storage, so this is the only storage I have available on it). The t2.micro has 1 vCPU and 1 GB RAM, comparable to the current Nanode 1GB at Linode when it comes to base resources. My last AWS bill (for May 2018), specifically for the EC2 instance, amounted to $31.37, plus data transfer. I also have S3 storage, and the data transfer bill is for everything, but since the total amount for data transfer at AWS was $0.31, it's still kinda small, and was something like 50-55 GB total (the billing statement is a little hard to read). I'm not using it that much, I know.

OK, so let's round that up to $31.50 for my EC2 instance, for 30 days of runtime.

If I upgrade myself to a Linode 2GB instance, I get 50 GB storage included, and if I want to have the same storage available, I need to add 150 GB of block storage to that. This comes to a monthly bill of $25 flat, and then I also have twice the RAM, and 2 TB data transfer included in it.

If I upgrade myself to a Linode 4GB instance, I get 80 GB storage included, and I could then add 120 GB of block storage. This comes to a monthly bill of $32 flat, which is a few cents more than what I pay for my EC2, but then I also have 4 times the RAM, 2 CPU cores (instead of 1), and 4 TB of included data transfer, which is also pooled with the data transfer of my other 5 Linodes (which is currently at 15 TB already).

Winner on this calculation: Linode!

However, the larger downside is the system transfer; basically, transition all customer data, stored emails (from mailboxes on the system), websites, etc. and change over all DNS records to the new IP address. A system transfer like this is always a pain, and that's the only part I'm not looking forward to on something like this.

1 Reply

Yes, Linode/DigitalOcean/etc. are all cheaper than AWS, that's well established. There's more to compare than just price.

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