How can I create a user account in Fedora 33?

I'm very frustrated here. I have been following instructions on "creating a linode" and keep getting stuck on the creating a user account after having established a root user. If I cut and paste a command found for fedora it seems to get no where. the command is ssh (my created name)@myip address .

After I input my password I get a return that repeats my created user name such as [email protected]'s password: and then I keep going around in circles!
If I try to create it again all over it just tells me that it already exists! Please help! and how now do I remove all the other user accounts I created trying to create one that may work! Its made me create a mess of different user accounts now that I can't access!

4 Replies

@Oscar770 writes:

If I cut and paste a command found for fedora it seems to get no where.

It would be helpful if you posted the command you're using. From your description it's impossible to tell what that is.

The command for adding a user is useradd(8):

https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/Fedora/12/html/Deployment_Guide/s2-users-add.html

You also write:

Please help! and how now do I remove all the other user accounts I created trying to create one that may work!

The command to delete a user is userdel(8) (see a pattern here?):

https://linuxize.com/post/how-to-delete-users-in-linux-using-the-userdel-command/

-- sw

Thanks, not sure I see the pattern. What does (8) mean? The command I'm using, (i thought I showed in my original post) is useradd example_user && passwd example_user as located /securing-your-server/.

THANK YOU !!!!

Also, how do I look for all the users I created that I created trying to figure out this mess?

@Oscar770 writes:

The command I'm using, (i thought I showed in my original post) is useradd example_user && passwd example_user

The correct form is: useradd example_user -p <insert password here> or as two commands (shown here as if you are logged in as root…indicated by the # shell prompt):

# useradd example_user
# passwd example_user
New password:  <enter un-echoed password here>
Retype new password: <enter the same un-echoed password here>
passwd: password updated successfully
#

IMHO, the form you posted is typically used in shell scripts…not for interactive use…or maybe you weren't running your script as the superuser…hard to tell…

You also write:

What does (8) mean?

(8) refers to the section of man(1) where you will find the man(1) page for useradd(8), userdel(8) etc…as in:

man 8 useradd

It's an old-school Unix notation for referring to commands. It's used to differentiate between two man(1) pages with the same name…as in:

  • man crontab or man 1 crontab
    for the man(1) page for the program called crontab(1) and
  • man 5 crontab
    for the man(1) page explaining the format of configuration files for the program called crontab(1).

Section 1 is for ordinary user commands: ls(1), cat(1) etc. Section 5 is for configuration files: hosts(5), crontab(5), etc. Section 8 is for system administration commands (typically restricted to the superuser): useradd(8), mount(8), umount(8), etc.

You can find out what each section of man(1) is for by entering:

man <section> intro

where <section> is a number in the range 1..8. Sometimes specialized apps will install man(1) sections of their own (in /usr/share/man and /usr/local/share/man on Linux). For example, if you install the tcl interpreter, you will most likely get man(1) Section n with man(1) pages for all tcl interpreter commands/functions (man n yaml).

You can set your own personal search path for man(1) pages by setting up the environment variable MANPATH. It works similar to PATH but for man(1) pages. Using MANPATH will allow you to have your own personal man(1) pages that no one else can see (the default MANPATH is /usr/share/man:/usr/local/share/man…you can change everything about man(1) by modifying /etc/manpath.config).

man(1) pages must be written in a special format described here:

https://babbage.cs.qc.cuny.edu/courses/cs701/Handouts/man_pages.html

You also write:

Also, how do I look for all the users I created that I created trying to figure out this mess?

See:

https://linuxize.com/post/how-to-list-users-in-linux/

DANGER WILL ROBINSON! DANGER! DANGER!

Deleting users is inherently dangerous. You shouldn't delete ANY USER you don't recognize (mail, systemd-coredump, etc.). You should back up your system with a snapshot before doing this just in case you mess something up!

-- sw

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